AND THE FRAMES GO ON

As a stop motion animator there’s nothing worse than being midway through a shot and slowly realizing that the puppet feels wrong. So was the case late Sunday night when, about half way through a routine shot, the leg of one of my puppets seemed to be getting loose. As I struggled to continue the leg went from loose to useless and I eventually had to abandon the shot to see what was going on. Turns out the weld in the hip had given way. You expect certain faults to occur from time to time but this break was particularly difficult to fix without inflicting some major damage to the puppet. This is mainly because my puppets are entirely foam rubber and replacing armature parts is a lot trickier than if you’re working with a foam and fabric puppet. I can’t just undress them. As it was I needed to cut the puppet nearly in half in order to access and replace the defective part. His long coat, which has made animating a living hell from frame one, now helps to conceal the scares of my work which I take as a small victory. He’s back on the set now, ready to go and his hip fells marvelous.

FILTH FINDS A HOME

I started production on BROKEN on November 19, 2012 and for the past 8 years I’ve been working on my little library of short films. Having no particular agenda or timetable has its benefits but the one thing that has always been a challenge is finding an audience. Festivals and awards can raise your profile to a degree but let’s face it, you can’t do it alone. So when the opportunity presented itself to have FILTH added to the short film platform run by ALTER I jumped at the chance. Deputing on Friday the 13th no less I am understandably curious and excited to see the response to my little horror show now that it has been introduced to a much wider audience.

THE BAR IS OPEN

I’m animating again. Scene 11 runs about 2 minutes give or take a few seconds so I’m hoping to have it done by mid-December. Of course I’ve already added 2 shots so that time frame is fluid. Action scenes are tricky to storyboard. There are a lot of quick cuts and until you see the characters in motion it’s hard to know just how long each shot will be or if you’ll need to add more to make the action clear. Hence the 2 additional shots thus far. In some cases we’re talking cuts that last less than a second. I learned a lot from FILTH when it comes to editing action scenes. It’s amazing how much information an audience can absorb in just a fraction of a second.